Adult Martial Arts

Regardless of whether you want to learn Martial Arts for self protection, for fitness, competition, for weight loss or simply for fun, we have a class suitable for you to train in.

Full details on Adults Classes

Kid’s Classes

childrens martial arts basingstokeAt our Academy, children not only learn self-defence skills, they learn much more from us. Martial Arts training with us is different, it’s fun, it’s exciting and as a life skill is invaluable.

Full details on Children's Classes

Basingstoke and Deane Sports Awards

Written by bryan. Posted in News

Basingstoke Sports Awards

Congratulation to our members who took part in Basingstoke and Deane’s 2016 Sports Awards held at the beginning of March at The Apollo Hotel in Basingstoke. This years Sports Awards organised by Basingstoke Sports Council and Basingstoke and Deane Borough Council attracted a wealth of talent with competitors from many sports present from all over the Borough.

We had finalists in all the categories that we entered, which was a pleasing result. Our overall results were very good and marked the end of a good year for our Martial Arts club based in Basingstoke.

 

 

 

 

Bas2016SportsAwards26-min (1) (1) (1)Senior Team of the Year

Winners – Shin Gi Tai Senior Team

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Senior Disability Sportsperson of the YearBas2016SportsAwards02

Winner Mandi Miles

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Bas2016SportsAwards01Junior Disability Sportsperson of the Year

Runner Up – Scott Howes 

Winner Cameron Lloyd

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Senior Sportswomanof the YearBas2016SportsAwards09

3rd Place – Jessica Muller

Winner – Lindsey Andrews

 

 

IMG_7846Sportsman of the Year

Runner Up – Bryan Andrews

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

IMG_5265Junior Sportsman of the Year

3rd Place Harry Cronk –

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AMA Sheffield International Karate Competition

Written by Lindsey. Posted in Competition, News

AMA SummaryThe senior squad had a very busy weekend in Sheffield at the AMA International championships. This was one of the biggest competitions many of them had ever been to and they all did really well. Competitor entries for events ranged from 10 to 42, with almost all of the events for the 12-17 age groups having over 30 competitors. Kata events were held on Saturday with lots of the team making the final 6 but no medals this time. A good lesson learnt in what we need to push for. Kumite yesterday included individual sambon and ippon events and teams. The team all fought well, on many occasions our competitors were making the top 8 having won several fights before being beaten in the quarter finals. Well done to all of you who competed for your hard work and great attitude. As always proud to have you representing our club.

 

Special mention to Katie Dolan for winning a silver in ladies veterans kumite, Emma Baldry and Isabel Bailey for their silver medals in the team event and Edward van Meerkerk and Harry Cronk for their bronze medals in the team event.

 

Thank you for celebrating your birthday with us Emma Cronk and for supplying the donuts (you know how to make a sensei happy).

Thank you to those of you who kept me freshly supplied with cups of tea and to Zara for letting me steal her chips.

Thank you to my awesome navigator, Jacey, without whom the team would have had no coach. And a final but very large thank you to Mark, Michelle and Katie for helping with the coaching.

On a final note from me, anyone who’s recently heard me saying I’m ready to retire from competitions I’ve come to the conclusion that I was lying. Having to watch and not participate this weekend due to injury was really frustrating! I’ll be back 😉

 

 

 

Michelle Seienchin Where's 007
Zane - Bassai Dai It's a spaceman
Zara Unshu - Kick Emma Shobu Ippon
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Kata Course report

Written by bryan. Posted in Blog Posts

We recently ran a Kata class for members, it focussed upon a number of key Kata, split by grade and ability and the key principles and concepts within each.

Heian Sandan / Heian Yondan / Pinan Godan 

Although these three kata come from different style, they all cover similar concepts and .

  1. Correct use of fundamental stances (Front Stance/Zenkutsu Dachi, Horse Stance/Kiba Dachi or Sumo Stance/Shiko Dachi and Back Stance/Kokutsu Dachi or Cat Stance/Neko Ashi Dachi) in terms of foot and knee placement, weight distribution, use of hips and rooting/power sourcing
  2. Importance of correct position of each ‘block’ to facilitate delivery of follow on techniques
  3. As a way of ‘mastering’ the fundamentals of that style before moving onto the more advanced and complicated Kata

 

Seienchin / Nipaipo / Jion 

These kata were taught to more advanced students, generally Brown belt and above, as they  should already have a firm grasp of the key principles, we looked at

  1. Timing, Rythm, Speed
  2. Upper and lower body harmony, expansion and contraction
  3. Breathing and power
  4. Skilfulness of the techniques

and their affect on the delivery and performance of the Kata itself.

Jion

Seienchin

 

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SO YOU THINK IT’S EASY FOR ME?

Written by Lindsey. Posted in Coaching

LindseySO YOU THINK IT’S EASY FOR ME?

‘Yes, but it’s easy for you’ are words I hear frequently when coaching, typically when asking students to challenge themselves with something they cannot yet do. Yes I’m a Kata World champion, European champion, British champion and multiple sports award winner but what you don’t know is what I have had to do to get where I am.

Typically, I don’t reply with anything other than ‘it’s not about me, it’s about you. Keep working on it’. However, next time you think about giving up, or making excuses because you believe that someone else finds it ‘easy’ and you don’t, I want you to think for a moment about this; just because someone makes something look effortless, doesn’t mean it took no effort to attain the skill. ‘It’s easy for you’ is an assumptive, blasé comment which is often said without thinking, to excuse the fact that someone feels embarrassed that they can’t currently do something the way they would like to or because they can’t be bothered to put the required work into developing the skill.

Just think for a second, if you could do something to perfection already why would I be asking you, as a coach, to work on it? Why would I be asking for you to practise and giving you help and advice on how to improve if not because I believe that you can be better, that you want to be better? It is my way of making things ‘easy’ for you. As martial artists we need the things that we practise to come easily to us, if we feel uncoordinated, clumsy and slow in the way we move we will never be able to defend ourselves effectively. It should be our goal to work hard enough to make things appear effortless. As a coach, I do not want to spend my time being impressed by what you can do, I want to be impressed by the effort and attitude you put into what you can’t do.

I’m not perfect, no one is, but don’t ever believe for one moment that just because I can do something and do it well  that it’s easy for me. Everything I have achieved I have done because I have worked continuously hard over an extremely long period of time. Every one of us is different; there are things which I have picked up quickly which someone else will struggle with and vice versa.  I seek out the best instructors and I take the time to listen to what they have to say, and often what they say is critical. I write copious notes on everything which I often refer to and I put in hours and hours of practise, sometimes repeating individual moves hundreds of times over until I succeed in doing something so that it feels right. I ask questions, I research what I’m doing. It’s important to understand not only how to do something correctly but why it is the correct way.  None of this is easy.

Learning is a constantly evolving process. Complacency is dangerous, if you allow yourself to believe that you have mastered something you become complacent and cease to practise with the correct mindset. In this case you are now just going through the motions like a machine; not thinking, not feeling and not intuitively improving.  All training should be done with an open mind, ready to change, adapt and improve. As we grow older physical limitations make it necessary for us to adapt. We lose flexibility, speed and strength but at the same time we should be learning how to adapt our movements so we don’t lose the skills we have worked hard to master. People often become frustrated when they find they can no longer train and move the way they did in their youth. It no longer feels ‘right’ which is why we need to be open-minded when we train. What was right when I was 20 is no longer right for me now I’m in my 40’s. I have had to continue to adapt and continue to work hard.

For those who continue to train, to work and to develop their skills, there can always be improvement. These people find that their movements become softer, more fluid, smaller, wiser and simultaneously more effective.  At this point many of us look back and wish we had known when we started that things could be gentle on the body and yet effective. This is when, to the novice, things look effortless and ‘easy’ for those who have developed these skills.

Whenever you become frustrated that someone else appears to find something easy when you find it difficult consider that they were once where you are now. Looking at someone else wishing they had those skills, wondering why it seemed so easy for someone else. They are possibly still looking at someone else wishing their skills were at that level rather than the level that they are but, in their case, knowing that this will come with time and work and understanding that this hasn’t come easy – it has come through continuous effort and hard work.

Lindsey Anan FinalWhere I am hasn’t come easy for me, it has come as a result of many years of hard work. I have trained in martial arts for over twenty three years. I train, on average, for twenty hours per week with a mixture of personal training, private lessons, coaching and fitness work. I do more when I can. Just one year after I started training in martial arts I was diagnosed with M.E (also known as Chronic Fatigue Syndrome). As a result this has been anything but easy for me but I have never given up. You never know what anyone has struggled with or is currently struggling with and how hard they have worked to attain their goals and reach their current standard but I do know that with my own achievements I have felt an enormous sense of pride, this is not something you feel when something comes easy to you.

With this in mind, next time that you are faced with a challenge and someone else is making it look easy, ask yourself how much you want to achieve, how hard you are willing to work and how important it is to you to get there. Just because it looks easy for someone else doesn’t mean it came easily to them. Consider and appreciate the effort they have put in and then match that effort with your own.

Be the best that you can be.

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Martial Arts Standards Agency British Judo British Council for Chinese Martial Arts – National Governing Body The World Union of Karate Federations Shi Kon Martial Arts British Council for Chinese Martial Arts – National Governing Body

Contact Us

Telephone (01256) 364104.

Email: info@basingstokekarate.com.

Shin Gi Tai Martial Arts Academy,
The Annex @ ITT Industries,
Jays Close,
Basingstoke,
RG22 4BA