Katathon = Raising money for Myeloma UK

Written by bryan. Posted in Events

Katathon

We are excited to let you know that this year Shin Gi Tai are running our first ever Katathon event. Over the years we are proud to have supported many local and national good causes. Each year we always pick a charity to support that we can identify with and is important to us as a club.

This year we will be running a week long event to help the Muller family raise money for Myeloma UK.  who deliver programmes, services and research that meet the needs of everyone affected by Myeloma. They assist patients and their families by providing information about this type of cancer and the options available for care and treatment of the disease.

All club members are invited to take part in this event and help raise money for the vital work that Myeloma UK do.

Everyone will have the opportunity to take part in the following ways:

  • All members will have sponsorship forms to be provided in class and justgiving details https://www.justgiving.com/ShinGiTai-Katathon
  • You will be asked to raise sponsorship money for completing katas and forms There will be a prize for most money raised.
  • All classes during w/c 22nd May will include a Katathon section where everyone will be asked to do forms or katas which will be recorded so that we can keep a tally.
  • On SATURDAY MAY 28th from 1pm – 4pm we will run our Katathon MAIN EVENT where all members are asked to come along and support in the following ways:
    • Complete Kata and forms and raise sponsorship
    • Keep a tally for those doing Kata
    • Come along, donate money, buy raffle tickets and have fun
    • (There will be prizes on the day for different things and will include Best Kata, Best Dad, Best Mum + others)
    • You don’t have to attend all of this session, you can come and do little bits.

How can you help?

As well as being here and involved in the event we are asking you to help by donating raffle prizes and selling raffle tickets please.

Raffle tickets will be available to purchase in the office as of Thursday May 12th as well as on the day. Please encourage family members to buy tickets or donate money either by cash, cheque (made payable to Myeloma UK) or via our JustGiving Page. https://www.justgiving.com/ShinGiTai-Katathon 

 

***It would be particularly helpful if any of you who have business links could approach companies and organisations to see whether they would be kind enough to donate raffle prizes.

 

Please would you all share our JustGiving page https://www.justgiving.com/ShinGiTai-Katathon

and encourage friends and family to support your children/yourselves in effort to raise some money for a great cause while doing what we do best and pulling together as a team.

 

Enter our KataCount competition:

How many forms/Katas do you think we can do in a week?

Pay £1 per entry (This is a great game for the kids to take part in) Fill in your name and the amount of katas/forms you think we will manage on the form in the office. Closest to the actual number will win a goody bag.

If you have any questions or would like to offer your (much needed) support or if you have companies or organisations who would like to support our fundraiser please contact Mandi on: mandi.miles (at) basingstokekarate.com

 

We know that as a team we can accomplish great things. Let’s make this event a great success.

 

Sensei Bryan, Sensei Lindsey and all the team.

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The Beginner in the Martial Arts

Written by bryan. Posted in Events, Training Diary

Tai Chi, Split, Tai Chi Kick, TaijiThis week, I’m in the Czech province of Jizerka training on the 24th Shikon Jizerka course hosted by Shikon Czech and it’s Chief Instructor Ondra Musil 7th Dan in Karate and 6th Dan in Aikido who along with Steve Rowe 8th Dan in Karate and Tai Chi Sifu and Martin Gatter 7th Dan Karate and Tai Chi Sifu from Shikon International have been the teachers.

With around 80 participants mainly from the arts of Karate, Tai Chi, Kung Fu, Ju Jitsu and Aikido, there has been a range of diverse skills to sample and learn from.

Today is Wednesday and we’re half way through the course. My training plan for the week has been simple:-

7:00 Tai Chi (Chi Gong, Long Form and Long Boxing)

8:00 Breakfast

9:00 – 10:30 Tai Chi (Long Boxing, Fa Jing, Dao Lu)

10:30 – 12:00 Aikido

13:00 Lunch / Enjoying the countryside / Free Practice

15:00 – 16:30 Tai Chi (Long Boxing, Fa Jing, Dao Lu)

16:30 – 18:00 Aikido

19:00 – Dinner / Enjoying the Countryside / talking about all things martial and more free practice

So the training plan itself was easy, right. Okay it was and is tiring I have to admit. When I decided to come to Jizerka earlier in the year, I committed to myself that I would make the most out of the training experience and learn as much as I could. So many good things shown and explained, shown again and clarified, it felt like at times my head was about to explode.

I’ve tried to train as a beginner with no preconceived ideas,  actions or knowledge whilst training. It’s been hard to do and sometimes I haven’t managed to, these times have generally been easy to spot, it’s when I’ve been doing it badly. It’s been oddly satisfying though when I’ve have got it right. Some light bulb moments and several real “oh yeah, I get it now” moments, followed quickly by “Doh, it’s so easy to understand, why did it take me so long.” Simple Young Jedi, it’s all down to the key principles, I was told more than once. Principle #1 – Feet, Principle #2 – Posture, now use them. Steve Rowe is my teacher and his long term students know his style of teaching very well. No false, “that was great” or “You’re awesome” or anything like that. In fact the only time Steve will say something like that is when one has been crapper than usual and he’s taking the mickey out of you. Even he’s excelled himself this week with some of his comments and insightful remarks. Many of us attending are long term Martial Arts coaches and practitioners in our own right. Yet I can’t begin to count how many times, I’ve heard a ‘Steveism’ and some attempted correction at whatever we needed to work on. I snuck off before lunch for a sneaky bit of training with someone on some Springing hands work and Long Boxing, from about 300m away, Steve spotted an error from my training partner and sent someone over to stay “stop sticking your butt out and stand straight.”

Remember those days as a kid and being told to sit still at school, or was that just me? Anyway today Martin led us in some Neigong or standing post work. Simple stuff, again! Or so it seemed at a superficial level. Hold five postures for two minutes each. Oh yes, there are a few things to consider when you do them. Stand tall, spine straight, start spiralling from the feet and carry it on up and around the body, heighten your awareness, map your body, be sensitive and be aware. I managed about three out of the five, but then lost focus. Only one person said that they managed all those things throughout the 10 minutes.

 

I’ve seen some demonstrations of Aikido over the years and I must admit to not been hugely impressed with it as as art. My mistake, big mistake. The Aikido classes I’ve taken part in have all been by Ondrej Musil a 6th dan in Aikido or one of his senior students. The classes were filled with Czech students and one English person, me. Consequently all have been taught in Czech. So listening to instructions was definitely out, but I had to focus very closely to see what was being demonstrated as both Tori and Uke and then work to replicate it with my partners. I was able to cheat a little bit as many of the a few Japanese terms used in Aikido are also used in Karate, such as Maai, Kuzushi and Atemi Waza. It made me realise that although I was learning this way, only learning visually was very difficult for me. But I muddled through and most things I managed by watching and best of all trying the techniques. The moral is, you can learn by talking, you can learn by watching. But the best way is to learn by doing and making mistakes and doing it again and again.

 

It’s been good to see so many students finish the formal practice and then find some space in the great outdoors to continue their practice. My last training session tonight, after dinner, but still in the restaurant, I asked “Wasn’t sure how to do this technique, is this correct?” From the laughter from my colleagues it would appear not, Martin Gatter, didn’t laugh, well not out loud anyway, his brow however does the same as a ‘Steveism.’ 

Key points for me

– When the teacher says do ‘x’ technique, don’t ask how many times, keep going until you’re told to stop.

– It’s reminded me of how much we should listen and watch our teachers and actually try to do what they say.

– Be aware of your body

– You can learn by talking, you can learn by watching. But the best way is to learn by doing and making mistakes and doing it again and again.

Happy training. Time to get ready for dinner before I do some training.

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Beginners Judo Course

Written by bryan. Posted in Events


adults judo basingstoke, basingstoke judo, BJA judo, Our Judo club in Basingstoke is pleased to announce an initiative with Sport Hampshire and IOW plus The British Judo Association to help attract newcomers into Judo as a sport.

Black Friday Special Offer November 2014 

we are offering 

8 weeks of FREE 

Judo Classes

plus FREE Judo uniform 

If you’re looking to get fit and want something more than going to a Gym, than come and have a try at this. Just call us on 01256 364104 to take advantage of this offer.

Judo is not only an Olympic sport, it’s also a great way to get fit and tone up, whilst learning some very useful skills and building self defence knowledge.

We are Basingstoke’s only Clubmark accredited Judo Club, awarded by Sport England for Sports Clubs that are able to provide high quality, safe sport for it’s members young and old.

 

 To arrange your 8 weeks of Totally FREE JUDO classes in Basingstoke please complete the information below, so that we can contact you to arrange your FREE classes.

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Please send me more info on the Free Judo Classes


 

For further information on our adults Judo classes in Basingstoke visit http://www.basingstokekarate.com/basingstoke-judo-club/ or telephone us on 01256 364104

 

For under 14s we also provide Children’s Judo http://www.basingstokekarate.com/childrens-judo-class-in-basingstoke

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Nipaipo Kata Course

Written by bryan. Posted in Coaching, Events

NipaipoSaturday 8th February saw our Karate club run a Kata Masterclass in Basingstoke. 4th Dan Lindsey Andrews and current World Veterans Kata Champion taught the Shito Ryu Kata Nipaipo.

Lindsey began with a brief history of Nipaipo and throughout the Masterclass gave technical tips on how to perform the Kata.

  • There is some disagreement of the Meaning of it’s name with some people saying 28 steps and others saying two eight steps. The original meaning has been lost
  • It’s also known as Nepai in some styles of Karate.
  • Taken originally by Kenwa Mabuni from White Crane style Kung Fu (one of the names it was known as was Er Shi Ba) and adapted to Shito Ryu style of karate. Further adaptations were made by Teruo Hayashi, another exponent of Shito Ryu in the 1980’s.
  • It can also be seen in some Kung Fu styles as Quick Fist form (Sangfeng Quaichuan). The Kung Fu version is much softer and more flowing but similarities are still apparent.
  • Typically considered as 2nd dan and above level kata, in some groups it’s a 6th Dan level Karate kata.
  • Has been taken from Shito Ryu and adapted to suit other styles of karate (e.g. Shorin Ryu).
  • Approx 47 moves incorporating punches, kicks, blocks, locks and throws.

Learning and studying Kata is an important part of karate training. As a form of training it teaches us co-ordination, concentration, develops physical strength, speed, focus, power, breath control and martial skill.

Peeling the Onion.IMG_4542

The process of learning kata involves many layers of development. Typically we start by looking at the moves and their basic elements such as the placement of the feet and hands and slowly piece together the sequence until we have learnt the whole kata.

We also look at the bunkai or meaning and application of the moves, it’s important to understand the applications which you are practising – if not, then ultimately you are merely performing movements with your hands and feet, like a dance,  but you have lost the essence of the martial art which you are trying to learn.

As we become more confident in the sequence we can start to layer in the correct speed, timing, focus and breathing. It is an ongoing learning process and no matter how long you’ve been studying there are always things which can be improved and new and varied applications to be uncovered.

Performing kata in competition adds a new dimension to the challenge. It takes confidence and self-control to perform before judges, spectators and against the abilities of others. It’s amazing how a kata can be performed 100 times in the dojo correctly but when the additional stresses of competition are added the mind goes blank and competitors forget moves or let the nerves take over and lose their strength and spirit. There are some stringent rules applied to competitors which are used to judge a winning performance. There are typically 3 – 5 judges who observe the competitor from different angles and award points based on the following;

 

In a Kata Match, each performance will not be deemed simply good or bad, but will be judged according to the essential elements in two different criteria:

BASIC PERFORMANCE

The following basic points must appear in each performance of a Kata:

  1. Kata sequence.
  2. Control of power.
  3. Control of tension and contraction.
  4. Control of speed and rhythm.
  5. Direction of movements.
  6. Understanding Kata technique.
  7. Show proper understanding of the Kata Bunkai.
  8. Coordination.
  9. Stability and balance.
  10. Pauses.
  11. Kiai.
  12. Breathing.
  13. Concentration.
  14. Spirit.

 

IMG_4555ADVANCED PERFORMANCE

Judges will note the specific important points and the degree of difficulty of the performed Kata. Judgment will be based on:7

a) The mastery of techniques by the contestant.

b) The degree of difficulty and risk in the performance of the Kata.

c) The Budo attitude of the contestant.

 

 

The following youtube clips worth having a look at if you wish to look further into this kata:

http://youtu.be/Bt-jtJOqthw               Quickfist form

http://youtu.be/FXzmbgMs-08           Nepai kata

http://youtu.be/5lsb-Rn2pCM            Nipaipo kata

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Martial Arts Standards Agency British Judo British Council for Chinese Martial Arts – National Governing Body The World Union of Karate Federations Shi Kon Martial Arts British Council for Chinese Martial Arts – National Governing Body

Contact Us

Telephone (01256) 364104.

Email: info@basingstokekarate.com.

Shin Gi Tai Martial Arts Academy,
The Annex @ ITT Industries,
Jays Close,
Basingstoke,
RG22 4BA